Solo Dance

As the sport of figure skating grows through the ages, new disciplines and others have off-shoots. While Ice Dancing is still a loved sport to watch by many, there are many ice dancers that love this discipline but have not found a partner to compete with. Thus, Solo Dance was created. Competition options include: Patterned Dance, Combined Dance including one pattern dance (Novice and below) or short dance (Jr/Sr) and a free dance, and Shadow Dance consisting of a pattern dance skated by two skaters without connecting/holding.

The Solo Dance Series run from February through mid August each year. Skaters must register to have points at various competitions they compete at to be tracked; skaters can compete in more than one NSD type. The top 6 competitors at each level within each Section for each type (Pattern, Shadow, Combined) are invited to the National competition. 

 

2016 Solo Dance Series

Denver FSC had two skaters registered to compete throughout the year and possibly qualify for the National Solo Dance competition held in September 2016 in Newark, Delaware. 

Kaitlynne Funderburgh
Combined: Intermediate — Midwest, 11th 
Pattern: Bronze — Midwest, 12th 

Rachel Ruetz 
Combined: Junior — Midwest, 7th 
Pattern: Gold — Midwest, 6th (invited to Nationals)
National Solo Dance Competition — Gold Solo Dance Group A, 6th 

Sirinya Frankel
Pattern: Preliminary — Midwest, 14th

 

What is Solo Dance?

The Solo Dance Competition Series, was launched in January 2011. This program serves as a membership and dance discipline development tool, and is open to individual skaters within the Eastern, Midwestern and Pacific Coast sections.

The Solo Dance Competition Series is an expansion of the National Solo Dance Championships and provides an avenue for ice dancers at the Standard Levels to compete at and qualify for the National Solo Dance Final.

The goal of this program is to create a fun, nationwide competitive program for solo dancers that will allow them to expand their competitive opportunities, have the chance to qualify for a national event, keep travel costs down and increase the visibility of ice dancing at local competitions.